Breaking News

Bipartisan budget plan passes House, now heads to Senate

NBC
News

POSTED: Friday, December 13, 2013 - 5:26pm

UPDATED: Friday, December 13, 2013 - 6:14pm

The Republican-led House passed a two year bipartisan budget plan Thursday. Now, it's headed to the Democratic-controlled Senate sometime next week.

The budget passed overwhelmingly in the house by 332-to-94 vote. The House vote shows this budget plan is very likely to be signed into law by President Obama.The two year plan reduces the deficit by about $23 billion , would end some automatic spending cuts on federal agencies and reduces the chances of another government shutdown.

"Its better than what it could have been, but it's pretty lousy," said Smith County Democratic Chairman David Henderson. 

Democratic Senate Budget Committee Chairman Patty Murray and Republican House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan announced earlier this week they reached a two year budget agreement. Wisconsin Representative Paul Ryan said the plan does not raise taxes and it cuts spending. It also eliminates $65 billion in sequester cuts. This deal will keep the government funded for the next two years.

The White House called it "the most important moment of bipartisan cooperation" after a year of divided government. But, local political groups disagree.

"Apparently the House isn't going to shut down the government again. I think they got their knuckles wrapped on the last one, so if that's progress that's progress,'' said Henderson. 

"It doesn't do anything to get us away from the unconstitutional spending that we have in Washington," said Executive Director of Grassroots America JoAnn Fleming.

Conservative groups are worried the plan increases spending in the short-term and raises the federal borrowing limit. "The federal government still spends to much, borrows to much and over regulates," said Fleming. 

In a statement to KETK, Congressman Jeb Hensarling said "I'm aware of the impact our nations growing debt will have on future generations if we don't address it, and address it soon. There is no issue I have worked harder on than attempting to deal with our spending-driven debt. it is unsustainable, unconscionable, and immoral. Not only are we operating on borrowed money, we are operating on borrowed time."

 Democrats said they're disappointed the budget plan did not extend long-term unemployment benefits and not going far enough to address sequester cuts. "It's not only heartless its bad economics," said Henderson.

But local political groups do agree, the budget should do more for our military and veterans.
 

Comments News Comments

Post new Comment