Is cursive writing a thing of the past?

Stacey Spivey
News

POSTED: Tuesday, January 7, 2014 - 7:02pm

UPDATED: Tuesday, May 6, 2014 - 10:49am

Even though the future is unwritten, cursive writing will be taught in Texas schools for now.  While schools across the nation may be no longer teaching this historic writing skill, Amy Laney, English Language Arts Facilitator at Tyler ISD, says cursive writing is still alive in the lone star state.  "So many of our primary source documents for example the Constitution, and the Declaration of independence are written in cursive so we cannot let it be a dying art," said Laney.

All of the third and fourth grade students learn how to write in cursive, and it is used every day in their schools for essays and responses to literature.  It can also be used it for the writing portion of the STARR exam. 

However, the Common Core Curriculum does not require schools to teach cursive writing.  Common Core is used in 45 states, and the standard says students by the end of the 4th grade should be able to demonstrate "sufficient command of keyboarding skills,"

While some see it as a dying art and being replaced with today's technology, Etiquette East Texas Amy Riestenberg believes it should be used.  "I think we still need to be teaching it...it shows elegance and grace, and it shows you took the time and effort to care about somebody to write something down, to take a pen and not just type it," said Riestenberg.

 

Do you think cursive writing is a thing of the past? Or do you think it should still be taught in school?  Leave your comments below!

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Everyone should be taught to read and write cursive. Why teach kids how to tie shoes or tell time? Just use Velcro and digital clocks/ watches. The dumbing down of society. People working cash registers can't figure out how to give change unless it tells it on the register. Sad.

Questioned document examiners (these are specialists in the identification of signatures, the verification of documents, etc.) inform me that the least forgeable signatures are the plainest.
Most cursive signatures are loose scrawls: the rest, if they follow the rules of cursive at all, are fairly complicated: these make a forger's life easy.
All writing, not just cursive, is individual — just as all writing involves fine motor skills. That is why, six months into the school year, any first-grad

What about signatures? In state and federal law, cursive signatures have no special legal validity over any other kind. (Hard to believe? Ask any attorney!)

Mandating cursive to preserve handwriting resembles mandating stovepipe hats and crinolines to preserve the art of tailoring.

Why not just teach children to READ cursive — along with teaching other vital skills, such as some handwriting style that's actually typical of effective writers?

Educated adults are quitting cursive. In 2012, handwriting teachers were surveyed at a conference run by Zaner-Bloser, a publisher of cursive textbooks. Only 37% wrote in cursive; another 8% printed. The majority — 55% — wrote a hybrid: some elements resembling print-writing, others resembling cursive.

Handwriting matters — but does cursive matter? The fastest, clearest handwriters join only some letters: making the easiest joins, skipping others, using print-like forms of letters whose cursive and printed forms disagree. (Sources below.)

Reading cursive matters, but even kids can be taught to read writing they aren't taught to use. Reading cursive can be taught in just 30-60 minutes, even to five- or six-year-olds who can read print (There's even an iPad app teaching how: "Read Cursive.")

Handwriting matters — but does cursive matter? The fastest, clearest handwriters join only some letters: making the easiest joins, skipping others, using print-like forms of letters whose cursive and printed forms disagree. (Sources below.)

Reading cursive matters, but even children can be taught to read writing that they are not taught to produce. Reading cursive can be taught in just 30 to 60 minutes — even to five- or six-year-olds, once they read ordinary print.

Too many educators stop and think about the fact that for about three years children learn to form print-like letters, writing them from top-to-bottom. Shapes and directionality of strokes are implanted in motor memory.

Then  in either second or third grade the motor memory for forming letters is turned upside down! The strokes that form letters change sequence and direction for the sort of cursive that is commonly known. It is difficult for many students. Instruction time is limited,

Discarding skills such as cursive writing would be most tragic. There is something about cursive that is elegant, refined. I love seeing others signatures and the elegance with which they write. Keep cursive writing skill in our schools.

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